Christian Computing

Christian computing? What does that mean?

Are the courses on this site Bible courses? No, but my video courses on various computer topics are wholesome, family-friendly, and God-honoring.

As a Christian, I believe all that I do should honor God.

And whatever you do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through Him.  Colossians 3:17 NKJV

I want that to be reflected in the video courses on this site, my web design projects, the children's book series I write, and in my everyday life.

To keep up to date with the latest in the ever-changing world of computing, I do a lot of studying myself. I frequently watch or read computer tutorials. I'm often dismayed at the language and/or images used in them. 

Here's a mild example - I've seen/heard much worse.

One of the newest trends in web design is using what's called a css grid. I signed up for a free video course, which was professionally produced and sponsored by the Firefox web browser. Partway through the course, the adult, male instructor seemed to develop a strange fascination with the word circled in the screen capture - repeating it over and over. While I realize it's not the worst word in the world, it was just totally uncalled for in a supposedly professional presentation. :(

When I was working on my Bachelor's degree in Computer Science many years ago, a topic that came up in one of the courses was computing ethics. The professor presented a scenario in which we would be working for a company that asked us to do something unethical as a programmer. The professor asked the students how they would respond. I remember being shocked to be the only one that saw that as unquestionably wrong. Most of the students said they would do what the employer asked.

The computer, as with other things in this world, may be used for good or evil purposes. Some of the evil is too disgusting to even write about. But, one example of using computers in an unethical manner is election fraud.

Computer programmer, Clinton Eugene Curtis, testified before the U.S. House Judiciary, that he was hired by Congressman Tom Feeney in 2000 to build a prototype software package that would secretly rig an election, swaying the result 51% to 49% to whatever side was desired. He stated that it would be easy to do and the vote tampering would be undetectable.

Rest assured that my computer courses contain no objectionable language, images, or ideas. The Homeschool Spark courses encourage positive, ethical, and creative uses of computers!

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